Out-of-Home vs. TV Advertising.

Similar in style and user objectives, television and out-of-home (OOH) advertising have long been rivals. But with both channels having experienced extensive disruption in the last decade, which one has prevailed against the digital tidal wave?

Given the importance of digital engagement for brands, both forms of advertising are now very much focused on driving consumers to interact online. In 2017, it was found that over a period of six months, 46% of the sample group searched for a brand online from a billboard, compared to 57% saying they had searched online from a TV advertisement.

In a recent study by Nielsen, it was concluded that OOH continues to drive a higher volume of online interaction than television, radio or print. With OOH growing faster than TV, it continues to deliver higher return on investment (ROI) than any other offline advertising medium (Nielsen, 2019).

Television

Historically, television has been a far-reaching, highly engaging channel for brands to influence customers in their homes. The primary strengths of TV advertising have always been the scale of its audience, the ability to reach people at home and the fact that it is a multi-sensory medium including sound, sight and movement.

However in recent years the way in which television is consumed has become far more fragmented. With television available on-demand through various channels: smartphones, tablets, computers and smart TVs, audiences operate on convenience consumption. This has meant that audiences have declined; with greater choice of channels, platforms and viewing options it is no longer as easy to reach a large audience in one fell swoop.

This is coupled with the fact that various advertising channels on smartphones, tablets and computers can now also display multi-sensory content wherever the consumer is. For example, ads on Facebook, Youtube and Instagram, as well as sponsored posts now have the ability of communicating in the same way as a TV advert for far less cost.

Out-of-Home

Eros Piccadilly.

Out-of-Home has traditionally been compared to TV advertising due to its comparable reach. OOH previously fell behind TV advertising given TV’s immediacy and timeliness –digital OOH (DOOH) now means that it has the same capabilities.

Digital screens can be updated instantly and facilitate movement and storytelling through video.

DOOH also possesses improved metrics. With far more accurate measuring tools, such as traffic data, gaze tracking and QR codes, brands can be far more aware of the success of their campaigns.

OOH has also retained its unique strengths. These include: its difficulty to be ignored, high audience retention rates, strategic geographical placement and long-lasting impressions through long display times. And actually, the fact that OOH exists apart from our smartphones is a benefit, as it means that we grant it more worth because it isn’t part of the influx of advertising that we receive through our small screens.

However, OOH’s capabilities are still restricted, with limited ability to convey information such as sound. Metrics to measure effectiveness are also limited, with their analytics only just having been developed and integrated with other channel metrics.

Regardless, OOH is undoubtedly an advertising medium that neither brands nor consumers can ignore. Whilst it may lack certain featured of television, its steadfast eye-catching quality means it is here to stay.

Integration

These two channels are known to deliver the highest advertising awareness. 87% of people retain a TV advert seen in the last month and 74% for OOH. With such strong retention power, can they work hand in hand to drive even higher brand awareness?

If you have the budget, using both DOOH and TV advertising has the potential to create even more brand awareness. When studied, there are in fact various aspects of OOH and TV that differ significantly. This means that when used together, their targetting can complementary. Both drive the same results, but target consumers at very different points of their day. For example, the impressions received by OOH and TV differ depending on time of day – with most people out and about before 6pm, and a larger proportion of people at home post-6pm, OOH and TV adverts used together mean people can be targetted throughout the day.

Similarly, a combination of these two channels can reach consumers in different states of mind. When outside, consumers are far more alert, active and receptive. In contrast to our mood when watching TV, which tends to be relaxed, calm and sometimes bored. These moods will inevitably change the way that consumers interact with brands and how receptive they are to adverts. By using both channels, brands reach their audience in various moods, when they might respond to different things.

Therefore, considering the alternate ways that OOH and TV target audiences, using them together can create a powerful brand awareness strategy.

 

The division of media has ultimately played in OOH’s favour as it remains strong inits influence; partly due to its upgraded technology. OOH is set apart by its organic and non-intrusive nature, whereas traditional TV advertising has undeniably taken a hit.

With OOH on the up, it is still unclear which channel is most effective, but we can still be sure that both are useful tools in creating brand awareness.

Similar posts:

MicroLED: The first advance in LED technology for a decade

Bringing the world into even higher resolution with brighter, more realistic images, MicroLED will create screen displays we didn’t think possible.

Read more

The New Technologies Disrupting Out-of-Home Advertising.

As we know, digital technology is rapidly evolving – creating new opportunities for both brands and consumers to communicate. This article explores four technological advances disrupting digital out-of-home (DOOH) advertising as we know it.

Read more

Out-of-Home vs. TV Advertising.

Similar in style and user objectives, television and out-of-home (OOH) advertising have long been rivals. But with both channels having experienced extensive disruption in the last decade, which one has prevailed against the digital tidal wave?

Given the importance of digital engagement for brands, both forms of advertising are now very much focused on driving consumers to interact online. In 2017, it was found that over a period of six months, 46% of the sample group searched for a brand online from a billboard, compared to 57% saying they had searched online from a TV advertisement.

In a recent study by Nielsen, it was concluded that OOH continues to drive a higher volume of online interaction than television, radio or print. With OOH growing faster than TV, it continues to deliver higher return on investment (ROI) than any other offline advertising medium (Nielsen, 2019).

Television

Historically, television has been a far-reaching, highly engaging channel for brands to influence customers in their homes. The primary strengths of TV advertising have always been the scale of its audience, the ability to reach people at home and the fact that it is a multi-sensory medium including sound, sight and movement.

However in recent years the way in which television is consumed has become far more fragmented. With television available on-demand through various channels: smartphones, tablets, computers and smart TVs, audiences operate on convenience consumption. This has meant that audiences have declined; with greater choice of channels, platforms and viewing options it is no longer as easy to reach a large audience in one fell swoop.

This is coupled with the fact that various advertising channels on smartphones, tablets and computers can now also display multi-sensory content wherever the consumer is. For example, ads on Facebook, Youtube and Instagram, as well as sponsored posts now have the ability of communicating in the same way as a TV advert for far less cost.

Out-of-Home

Eros Piccadilly.

Out-of-Home has traditionally been compared to TV advertising due to its comparable reach. OOH previously fell behind TV advertising given TV’s immediacy and timeliness –digital OOH (DOOH) now means that it has the same capabilities.

Digital screens can be updated instantly and facilitate movement and storytelling through video.

DOOH also possesses improved metrics. With far more accurate measuring tools, such as traffic data, gaze tracking and QR codes, brands can be far more aware of the success of their campaigns.

OOH has also retained its unique strengths. These include: its difficulty to be ignored, high audience retention rates, strategic geographical placement and long-lasting impressions through long display times. And actually, the fact that OOH exists apart from our smartphones is a benefit, as it means that we grant it more worth because it isn’t part of the influx of advertising that we receive through our small screens.

However, OOH’s capabilities are still restricted, with limited ability to convey information such as sound. Metrics to measure effectiveness are also limited, with their analytics only just having been developed and integrated with other channel metrics.

Regardless, OOH is undoubtedly an advertising medium that neither brands nor consumers can ignore. Whilst it may lack certain featured of television, its steadfast eye-catching quality means it is here to stay.

Integration

These two channels are known to deliver the highest advertising awareness. 87% of people retain a TV advert seen in the last month and 74% for OOH. With such strong retention power, can they work hand in hand to drive even higher brand awareness?

If you have the budget, using both DOOH and TV advertising has the potential to create even more brand awareness. When studied, there are in fact various aspects of OOH and TV that differ significantly. This means that when used together, their targetting can complementary. Both drive the same results, but target consumers at very different points of their day. For example, the impressions received by OOH and TV differ depending on time of day – with most people out and about before 6pm, and a larger proportion of people at home post-6pm, OOH and TV adverts used together mean people can be targetted throughout the day.

Similarly, a combination of these two channels can reach consumers in different states of mind. When outside, consumers are far more alert, active and receptive. In contrast to our mood when watching TV, which tends to be relaxed, calm and sometimes bored. These moods will inevitably change the way that consumers interact with brands and how receptive they are to adverts. By using both channels, brands reach their audience in various moods, when they might respond to different things.

Therefore, considering the alternate ways that OOH and TV target audiences, using them together can create a powerful brand awareness strategy.

 

The division of media has ultimately played in OOH’s favour as it remains strong inits influence; partly due to its upgraded technology. OOH is set apart by its organic and non-intrusive nature, whereas traditional TV advertising has undeniably taken a hit.

With OOH on the up, it is still unclear which channel is most effective, but we can still be sure that both are useful tools in creating brand awareness.

Similar posts:

MicroLED: The first advance in LED technology for a decade

Bringing the world into even higher resolution with brighter, more realistic images, MicroLED will create screen displays we didn’t think possible.

Read more

The New Technologies Disrupting Out-of-Home Advertising.

As we know, digital technology is rapidly evolving – creating new opportunities for both brands and consumers to communicate. This article explores four technological advances disrupting digital out-of-home (DOOH) advertising as we know it.

Read more