The New Technologies Disrupting Out-of-Home Advertising.

As we know, digital technology is rapidly evolving – creating new opportunities for both brands and consumers to communicate. This article explores four technological advances disrupting digital out-of-home (DOOH) advertising as we know it.

Screen Interactivity.

The interactive abilities of screens are renewing interest in the use of digital signage beyond wayfinding and advertising. Touchscreens allow customers to explore brands, digest information and browse products.

Consumer’s expectations are ever-increasing, and we now anticipate more personalised experiences due to consumer demand. Personalisation empowers people and enhances everyday activities by making them more engaging.

Interactivity creates a new level of engagement between consumers and brands. A brilliant example of this was Women’s Aid’s ‘Don’t turn a blind eye’ campaign – featuring an image of a woman’s bruised face on a screen, which healed the more people looked at the panel.

Campaigns such as this create higher message retention that other billboard campaigns might not. With various technologies such as gender recognition, gaze tracking and even facial recognition becoming commonplace, expect to see more of these types of campaigns in the not too distant future.

 

Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Artificial Intelligence.

These three buzz technologies will (and have already) seeped into digital signage and DOOH. Obviously, VR, AR and AI will not be relevant for every brand, but there is lots of potential for them to be used in consumer experience to create new types of engagement.

As with interactivity, these technologies introduce personalisation for the consumer. VR and AR create richer, more (or less) realistic experiences for the user, adding an element of fun or “edutainment”, as well as a memorable brand experience.

 

Improved Data Analytics.

With metrics becoming standardised and new technologies developed, analytics for DOOH have improved. This means that the return on investment (ROI) is now far more easily measured.

Brands are therefore more attuned to the impact their out-of-home advertising is having. Software like facial recognition, gaze tracking and QR-code scanning give insight into campaign effectiveness and allow brands to measure and analyse campaign results.

Consequently, this leads to more targetted advertising strategies, with brands able to target the right audience with relevant content. As we know, one advert’s success will differ in different locations – now, we can accurately measure just how much they differ.

 

Integration.

Another feature of all these new technologies, is the level of channel integration that can now be achieved.

DOOH creates a scalable means of content delivery which is more beneficial to both display owners and their target audience. Brands can deliver hyper-targetted campaigns which mean audiences view contextually relevant content that in turn, enhances their brand interaction. This raises audience engagement rates and hence, creates more profitable businesses.

Improved data analytics means greater integration with data sources also. For example, mobile carrier data, online browsing behaviour and purchase history can all be used to determine how consumers are communicated with and which content they see.

A brilliant example of integration was Coca Cola’s now famous ‘Share a Coke’ campaign. It utilised a multi-platform communications strategy: the printing of popular names on its products along with using large-scale media platforms such as DOOH to reinforce the message. As we know, the campaign was incredibly successful and encouraged an impressive uplift in sales as well as sparking online conversations and media interest.

Another example was Ocean’s NHS ‘Give Blood’ campaign which used augmented reality to cleverly link smartphones with digital displays. The DOOH screen displayed a patient with an empty blood bag; a smartphone app on the viewers phone can then detect the users arm which then overlays an AR needle, plaster and tube onto the participant’s arm through the phone’s camera. This activity triggers the blood bag on the screen to fill up - the virtual donor can watch as the image of the ill patient gradually returns to health.

The dynamic real-time content used in this campaign inspires a new level of engagement between brand and consumer. These campaigns are leading examples of the impact omnichannel marketing can have. It is therefore no surprise that DOOH is set to become a core part of social and mobile campaigns in the future.

 

As we can see, OOH, an advertising channel that we once thought would fade out along with other analogue advertising channels, can in fact have great value in many marketing mixes. And with these technologies offering yet another facet to DOOH, this type of advertising is here to stay.

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The New Technologies Disrupting Out-of-Home Advertising.

As we know, digital technology is rapidly evolving – creating new opportunities for both brands and consumers to communicate. This article explores four technological advances disrupting digital out-of-home (DOOH) advertising as we know it.

Screen Interactivity.

The interactive abilities of screens are renewing interest in the use of digital signage beyond wayfinding and advertising. Touchscreens allow customers to explore brands, digest information and browse products.

Consumer’s expectations are ever-increasing, and we now anticipate more personalised experiences due to consumer demand. Personalisation empowers people and enhances everyday activities by making them more engaging.

Interactivity creates a new level of engagement between consumers and brands. A brilliant example of this was Women’s Aid’s ‘Don’t turn a blind eye’ campaign – featuring an image of a woman’s bruised face on a screen, which healed the more people looked at the panel.

Campaigns such as this create higher message retention that other billboard campaigns might not. With various technologies such as gender recognition, gaze tracking and even facial recognition becoming commonplace, expect to see more of these types of campaigns in the not too distant future.

 

Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Artificial Intelligence.

These three buzz technologies will (and have already) seeped into digital signage and DOOH. Obviously, VR, AR and AI will not be relevant for every brand, but there is lots of potential for them to be used in consumer experience to create new types of engagement.

As with interactivity, these technologies introduce personalisation for the consumer. VR and AR create richer, more (or less) realistic experiences for the user, adding an element of fun or “edutainment”, as well as a memorable brand experience.

 

Improved Data Analytics.

With metrics becoming standardised and new technologies developed, analytics for DOOH have improved. This means that the return on investment (ROI) is now far more easily measured.

Brands are therefore more attuned to the impact their out-of-home advertising is having. Software like facial recognition, gaze tracking and QR-code scanning give insight into campaign effectiveness and allow brands to measure and analyse campaign results.

Consequently, this leads to more targetted advertising strategies, with brands able to target the right audience with relevant content. As we know, one advert’s success will differ in different locations – now, we can accurately measure just how much they differ.

 

Integration.

Another feature of all these new technologies, is the level of channel integration that can now be achieved.

DOOH creates a scalable means of content delivery which is more beneficial to both display owners and their target audience. Brands can deliver hyper-targetted campaigns which mean audiences view contextually relevant content that in turn, enhances their brand interaction. This raises audience engagement rates and hence, creates more profitable businesses.

Improved data analytics means greater integration with data sources also. For example, mobile carrier data, online browsing behaviour and purchase history can all be used to determine how consumers are communicated with and which content they see.

A brilliant example of integration was Coca Cola’s now famous ‘Share a Coke’ campaign. It utilised a multi-platform communications strategy: the printing of popular names on its products along with using large-scale media platforms such as DOOH to reinforce the message. As we know, the campaign was incredibly successful and encouraged an impressive uplift in sales as well as sparking online conversations and media interest.

Another example was Ocean’s NHS ‘Give Blood’ campaign which used augmented reality to cleverly link smartphones with digital displays. The DOOH screen displayed a patient with an empty blood bag; a smartphone app on the viewers phone can then detect the users arm which then overlays an AR needle, plaster and tube onto the participant’s arm through the phone’s camera. This activity triggers the blood bag on the screen to fill up - the virtual donor can watch as the image of the ill patient gradually returns to health.

The dynamic real-time content used in this campaign inspires a new level of engagement between brand and consumer. These campaigns are leading examples of the impact omnichannel marketing can have. It is therefore no surprise that DOOH is set to become a core part of social and mobile campaigns in the future.

 

As we can see, OOH, an advertising channel that we once thought would fade out along with other analogue advertising channels, can in fact have great value in many marketing mixes. And with these technologies offering yet another facet to DOOH, this type of advertising is here to stay.

Similar posts:

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Out-of-Home vs. TV Advertising.

Similar in style and user objectives, television and out-of-home (OOH) advertising have long been rivals. But with both channels having experienced extensive disruption in the last decade, which one has prevailed against the digital tidal wave?

Read more